The Fly Room Lab Featured in the New York Times / by Alexis Gambis

 

“Pioneer Works host a genetics class, a film set and lots of flies”

April 23, 2013
New York Times / Science Times

A hundred years ago, in a cramped lab at Columbia University, a series of fruit-fly experiments led to the birth of modern genetics. The legendary Fly Room will be re-created, with brass-knobbed microscopes and hundreds of insect-filled milk bottles, at a summer exhibit in Red Hook that will serve as the set for a feature film. The project is the brainchild of Alexis Gambis, a French-Venezuelan geneticist and filmmaker who founded the Imagine Science Film Festival. While the room is under construction, Dr. Gambis will offer a three-night course examining how visual techniques, from ink drawings to fluorescent imaging, have advanced the field of genetics. Students will learn to tell male flies from females under a microscope and will start to breed flies with new traits as the century-old lab grows around them.

To register for the class: “Fly Microscopy: Origin of Gene Research”, visit Pioneer Works and click on this link.